PEFF 2015

                        

PEFF 2015

Mar. 19 | Mar. 20 | Mar. 21 | Mar. 22 | Mar. 23 | Mar. 24 | Mar. 25 | Mar. 26 | Mar. 27 | Mar. 28

 

THURSDAY, MARCH 19


 

ngel Azul
Produced and directed by Marcy Cravat
Thursday Mar. 19, 7:00 p.m.
Running time: 74 min.

ngel Azul tells the story of one artist’s inspiring attempt to draw attention to the perilous situation coral reefs currently face worldwide. Jason DeCaires Taylor is an eco-sculptor who casts cement statues from live human models and installs them on the ocean floor to create an artificial coral reef. The film follows the making of an angel, a symbol of hope, with wings made from live fan coral, to reside in an underwater museum alongside 400 of Jason’s statues located off the coast of Cancn in the National Marine Park, El Museo Subacuatico De Arte (MUSA). Over time the statues grow coral, provide habitat for marine life and a diversion for tourists offering the natural reefs a reprieve from heavy usage. The story takes a turn when the coral that had been growing on the statues starts to die and issues related to waste water pollution and rising sea temperatures become evident. Through local experts and scientists in the field the full scope of the problem is revealed.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Marcy Cravat.

More information

Return to top

 

FRIDAY, MARCH 20


 

Reaching Blue: Finding Hope Beneath the Surface
Produced & Directed by Ian Hinkle and Andy Robertson
Friday Mar. 20, 4:00 p.m.
Running time: 45 min.

A writer, an oyster farmer and an ocean scientist on the Pacific coast expose new changes found in the Salish Sea, linking each of us to the world’s oceans. With twenty-two cinematographers contributing imagery from deep-sea submarines, ocean research vessels and drone cameras around our local waters, we catch a glimpse of the Salish Sea as it has never been seen before. From John Steinbeck’s old research vessel The Western Flyer to residents of coastal communities facing dramatic changes in their own back yards, Reaching Blue shows that we are all connected to the ocean at our doorstep.

More information

 

Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story
Directed by Grant Baldwin and produced by Jen Rustemeyer
Friday Mar. 20, 7:00 p.m.
Running time: 75 min.

Filmmakers and food lovers Jen and Grant dive into the issue of waste from farm, through retail, all the way to the back of their own fridge. After catching a glimpse of the billions of dollars of good food that is tossed each year in North America, they pledge to quit grocery shopping cold turkey and survive only on foods that would otherwise be thrown away. In a nation where one in 10 people is food insecure, the images they capture of squandered groceries are both shocking and strangely compelling. But as Grant’s addictive personality turns full tilt towards food rescue, the ‘thrill of the find’ has unexpected consequences.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Jen Rustemeyer via video conference.

More information

Return to top

 

SATURDAY, MARCH 21


 

Shark Girl
Directed by Gisela Kaufmann and produced by Gisela Kaufmann & Carsten Orlt
Saturday Mar. 21, 12:00 p.m.
Running time: 58 min.

Conservationist, filmmaker, activist, delinquent – 19-year-old Madison Stewart has been called many things, but to her friends she’s simply ‘shark girl’. Growing up on the Great Barrier Reef, Madison soon realized the creature she loves most is disappearing fast. Driven by fear, every year up to 80,000 sharks are killed in this UNESCO World Heritage Site for cheap fish steaks and luxury shark fin soup. So turning passion into action, she sets out to stop the slaughter and shatter our perception of these alleged man-eaters. Armed with just a video camera, she fearlessly swims with tiger sharks, feeds a rowdy gang of Caribbean reef sharks and removes fishhooks from the mouths of oceanic silky sharks. She also investigates how more and more countries protect their sharks – Mexico, Palau, the Bahamas – and back home she bravely takes her campaign right to the heart of the shark fishing industry. Madison’s story is a powerful and call moving journey of one determined young woman’s passion to save the animal she loves.

More information

 

Pelican Dreams
Directed by Judy Irving
Saturday Mar. 21, 1:00 p.m.
Running time: 80 min.

What’s it like to try to get to know a flying dinosaur? Sundance-and- Emmy-Award-winning filmmaker Judy Irving (“The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill”) follows a wayward California brown pelican from her “arrest” on the Golden Gate Bridge into care at a wildlife rehabilitation facility, and from there explores pelicans’ nesting grounds, Pacific coast migration, and survival challenges. The film is about wildness: how close can we get to a wild animal without taming or harming it? Why do we need wildness in our lives, and how can we protect it? “Pelican Dreams” stars “Gigi” (named for Golden Gate) and “Morro” (a backyard pelican with an injured wing).

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Judy Irving via video conference.

More information

 

Chuitna: More Than Salmon on the Line
Directed by Trip Jennings and produced by Paul Moinster & Sam Weis
Saturday Mar. 21, 3:00 p.m.
Running time: 30 min.

Set in Alaska’s remote Chuitna Watershed, the film chronicles the journey of conservation-minded fly fishermen who travel to this unspoiled wilderness to wade waist-deep into its salmon-rich waters and the fight to defeat the proposed Chuitna Mine, which would destroy more than 30 square miles of this invaluable ecosystem. Through the eyes of Al Goozmer (Tyonek Tribal President), Terry Jorgensen (a commercial fisherman), and Judy and Larry Heilman (founders of the Chuitna Citizens Coalition), these anglers learn about the devastating impact the mine would have on the Chuitna’s residents as well as its vibrant lands and waters.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers via video conference.

More information

 

En La Orilla
Directed by Xavier Basurto and Liza Hoos
Saturday Mar. 21, 4:00 p.m.
Running time: 12 min.

Gaspar and his family live in Agua Verde, a 256-person town on the eastern coast of the Baja Peninsula in Mexico. Day by day, they struggle to catch enough fish and make enough money to pay for the things they need, living at the edge of their means.Fishing is getting harder every year, but Gaspar still has faith that with enough patience and time, he can maintain his family’s quality of life. Gaspar knows that his might be the last generation that can manage this balancing act, so he and his wife Silvia work hard to ensure their children will lead a different life from theirs – one that does not depend solely on fishing.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers via video conference.

More information

 

Mother Kuskokwim
Directed by Tim Guthrie, produced by John O’Keefe, and written by Carol Zuegner
Saturday Mar. 21, 4:30 p.m.
Running time: 23 min.

Mother Kuskokwim is a film about the people who live in the remote Yukon-Kuskokwim River Delta of Southwest Alaska. Here the native Yup’ik people continue to practice a subsistence lifestyle in a region suffering from severe economic hardship and climate change.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers via video conference.

More information

 

 

Song of the Sea
Directed by Tomm Moore
Saturday Mar. 21, 6:00 p.m.
Running time: 93 min.

Based on the Irish legend of the Selkies, the animated “Song of the Sea” tells the story of the last seal-child, Saoirse, and her brother Ben, who go on an epic journey to save the world of magic and discover the secrets of their past. Pursued by the owl witch Macha and a host of ancient and mythical creatures, Saoirse and Ben race against time to awaken Saoirse’s powers and keep the spirit world from disappearing forever.

After the screening ice cream and sorbet will be served courtesy of our friends at the bent spoon.

More information

Return to top

 

SUNDAY, MARCH 22


 

Song From the Forest
Sunday Mar. 21, 11:00 a.m.
Directed by Michael Obert
Running time: 96 min.

As a young man, American Louis Sarno heard a song on the radio that gripped his imagination. He followed the mysterious sounds all the way to the Central African rainforest and found their source with the Bayaka Pygmies, a tribe of hunters and gatherers. He never left.

Today, twenty-five years later, Louis Sarno has recorded more than 1,000 hours of unique Bayaka music. He is a fully accepted member of the Bayaka society and has a 13-year-old son, Samedi. Once, when Samedi was a baby, he became seriously ill and Louis feared for his life. He held his son in his arms through a frightful night and made him a promise: “If you get through this, one day I’ll show you the world I come from.”

Now the time has come to fulfill his promise, and Louis travels with Samedi from the African rainforest to another jungle, one of concrete, glass, and asphalt: New York City. Together, they meet Louis’ family and old friends, including his closest friend from college, Jim Jarmusch. Carried by the contrasts between rainforest and urban America, with a fascinating soundtrack and peaceful, loving imagery, Louis‘ and Samedi‘s stories are interwoven to form a touching portrait of a man and his son. “Song from the Forest” is a modern epic set between rainforest and skyscrapers.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with David Rothenberg, the film’s music supervisor.
Coffee courtesy of our friends at Small World Coffee.

More information

 

Oil & Water
Produced and directed and by Francine Strickwerda and Laurel Spellman-Smith
Sunday Mar. 22, 1:30 p.m.
Running time: 77 min.

Oil & Water is the true story of two boys coming of age as they each confront one of the world’s worst toxic disasters. Hugo and David were born on opposite ends of the oil pipeline. Hugo comes to America to fight for the survival of his Cofan tribe in the Ecuadorian Amazon, while David leaves the U.S. and goes to Ecuador to launch the world’s first company to certify oil as “fair trade.”

Their journeys lead them to explore what could be a more just future, not just for the Cofan, but for all people around the world born with oil beneath their feet.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers via video conference.

More information

 

Field Biologist
Produced and directed by Jared Flesher
Sunday Mar. 22, 4:00 p.m.
Running time: 53 min.

Tyler Christensen, a high-school graduate who loves the outdoors and wildlife, one day decides to begin his own research on birds in Costa Rica.

Christensen’s adventure took him to the cloud forests of Monteverde to the mangrove swamps of the Nicoya Peninsula and culminated in a plan to try to help save the highly endangered mangrove hummingbird.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A will filmmaker Jared Flesher and Tyler Christensen, the subject of the film.

More information

Return to top

 

MONDAY, MARCH 23


 

No Pipeline: Say the Friends of Nelson
Produced by Julie Burns, George McCollough, and Anna Savoia
Monday Mar. 23, 4:00 p.m.
Running time: 29 min.

The effects of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) are felt far and wide. “No Pipeline” looks at a community in Nelson County, Virginia fighting a gas pipeline which threatens the beauty of the countryside and change the way of life they have come to love.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmakers George McCollough and Anna Savoia.

 

 

 

Switch
Produced by Harry Lynch and Geologist Dr. Scott Tinker
Monday Mar. 23, 5:00 p.m.
Running time: 98 min.

Every energy resource — fossil, nuclear and renewable — is undergoing profound changes. This sweeping transition is the subject of “Switch” and travels the world to discover how it most likely will happen, with a focus on the practical realities and balanced understanding about changing the way we use energy, to realize the many economic and environmental benefits of efficiency.

The screening will be followed by a discussion led by Dr. Karl Muessig, State Geologist, Director of the New Jersey Geological and Water Survey.

More information

 

Above All Else
Produced and directed by John Fiege
Monday Mar. 23, 7:30 p.m.
Running time: 95 min.

In this first-hand account of activists on the front line of the climate fight, one man risks it all to stop the tar sands of the Keystone XL oil pipeline from crossing his land. Shot in the forests, pastures, and living rooms of rural East Texas, “Above All Else” follows David Daniel, a retired stunt man and high-wire artist, as he rallies neighbors and activists to join him in a final act of brinkmanship: a tree-top blockade of the controversial pipeline.

More information

Return to top

 

TUESDAY, MARCH 24


 

The Walking Revolution
Produced by Every Body Walk, Rigler Creative
Tuesday Mar. 24, 4:00 p.m.
Running time: 30 min.

Cities were once designed on a human scale. As more and more people took to the roads, the suburbs quickly became the new frontier. After 75 years of planning that produces a sedentary lifestyle, a radical redesign of our cities and open space has begun. Parks and paths are making a comeback to create truly walkable communities through partnerships between residents, businesses, developers, municipalities, urban planners and health care providers.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Sam Bunting, Princeton Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee, featuring: Kathy Smith, Program Officer at ‘Partners for Health’ and Board Chair, America Walks; Janet Heroux, Physical Activity Specialist, New Jersey Department of Health; Jim Constantine, Principal, Looney Ricks Kiss; and Jerry Foster, Safe Routes To Schools Coordinator, Greater Mercer Transportation Management Association

 

Antarctic Edge: 70º South (World Film Festival Premiere)
Produced and directed by Dena Seidel; Executive Produced by Rick Ludescher; Co-Produced by Steve Holloway, Xenia Morin and Chris Linder
Tuesday Mar. 24, 7:00 p.m.
Running time: 72 min.

In 2014, scientists declared West Antarctic ice sheet melting unstoppable, threatening the lives of millions of people over the next century. In the wake of devastating climate events such as Hurricane Sandy and Typhoon Haiyan, “Antarctic Edge: 70º South” follows a team of scientists who choose to live a life at sea in a race to understand climate change in the fastest winter-warming place in the world. While trekking through the dangerous and uncharted landscape of the West Antarctic Peninsula, these scientists push the limits of their research and come to terms with the sacrifices necessary to understand this rapidly changing world.

Screened at the library and Princeton Garden Theatre, 160 Nassau St. The screening at the Garden Theatre will be followed by a Q&A with director Dena Seidel, Mason Gross School of the Arts Dean George B. Stauffer; Rick Ludescher, executive producer; Steve Holloway and Xenia Morin, co-producers; and scientists Oscar Schofield and Doug Martinson, and Rutgers University students Darrel Gordon, Vincent Bradley, Isaiah McNeill, Stef Wong, Jaime Flores, and Gabriele Elise.

All welcome to the after-party with the filmmakers and film team at the Princeton Public Library starting at 8:45 p.m., with refreshments courtesy of The Nature Conservancy.

More information

Return to top

 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25


 

The Family Farm
Produced and Directed by Ari A. Cohen
Wednesday Mar. 25, 4:00 p.m.
Running time: 70 min.

“The Family Farm” explores the diverse agricultural pursuits of earnest farm families, and serves as a window into the small-scale food production process.

The film focuses on imbuing the importance of understanding where our food comes from and emphasizes the crucial role family farms play in ensuring the survival and well-being of local communities and environments.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Jared Flesher, filmmaker and Editor, Edible Jersey Magazine, featuring local first generation farmers: Rachel Mackow and Jared Rosenbaum, Wild Ridge Plants, LLC; Alec Gioseffi, Lauren Nagy and Matt Weiss, Cooperative 518; and Steven and Robin Tomlinson, Great Road Farm.

More information

 

Brilliant Darkness: Hotaru in the Night
Directed by Emily V. Driscoll; Executive Producer James Karl Fischer
Wednesday Mar. 25, 6:00 p.m.
Running time: 12 min.

“Brilliant Darkness: Hotaru in the Night” explores the importance of darkness, and erosion of it, through the study and preservation of firefly habitats in Japan and the United States. Fireflies disappear as artificial night lights disrupt their “languages of light.” The film features artists and scientists on different continents working to understand firefly flash patterns and how to live among wildlife in urban settings.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmakers Emily V Driscoll and Karl J. Fischer.

More information

Return to top

 

THURSDAY, MARCH 26


 

Great Ideas Breakfast – “How Is Our Planet Changing?”
Thursday Mar. 26, 8:30 a.m.

Sustainable Princeton hosts an exploration of how, why and if our planet is changing. The discussion will feature experts from our local community who will discuss this question from economic, scientific and practical viewpoints. Come enjoy a free breakfast catered by a locally owned business. This is a zero waste event.

 

 

 

 

Switch
Produced by Harry Lynch and Geologist Dr. Scott Tinker
Thursday Mar. 26, 10:00 a.m.
Running time: 98 min.

Every energy resource — fossil, nuclear and renewable — is undergoing profound changes. This sweeping transition is the subject of “Switch” and travels the world to discover how it most likely will happen, with a focus on the practical realities and balanced understanding about changing the way we use energy, to realize the many economic and environmental benefits of efficiency.

More information

 

 

Racing to Zero
Produced by Diana Fuller and directed by Christopher Beaver
Thursday Mar. 26, 12:00 p.m.
Running time: 59 min.

By substituting the word “resource” for the word “garbage,” a culture can be transformed, and a new wealth of industries can emerge, presenting new solutions to the global problem of waste. The film examines how the mayor of San Francisco pledged to achieve zero waste by 2020, and tracks San Francisco’s waste stream diversion tactics and presents innovative new solutions to waste. This film documents a surprising, engaging and inspiring race to zero.

More information

 

 

The PEFF Sustainability Bowl
Thursday Mar. 26, 4:00 p.m.

Kids in grades 3-6 are invited to compete in teams in this “Jeopardy” style game to win the PEFF Sustainability Bowl! Questions will be in categories and relate to energy, recycling, water, wildlife and more. Show what you know, and learn something too! Anyone interested in participating on a team is encouraged to register in advance or may sign up at the event and will be included as space is available. Participants please arrive by 3:45 p.m. to sign in. Younger children, teens and adults are encouraged to attend and root on the teams. Prizes will be awarded to all participants.

 

 

 

The Overnighters
Produced and directed by Jesse Moss
Thursday Mar. 26, 7:00 p.m.
Running time: 100 min.

In the tiny town of Williston, North Dakota tens of thousands of unemployed hopefuls show up with dreams of honest work and a big paycheck when hydraulic fracturing in that region unlocks a vast oil field in the nearby Bakken shale. Upon arrival, however, busloads of newcomers step into the sad reality of slim work prospects and nowhere to sleep – the town lacks the infrastructure to house even those who do find gainful employment.

Over at Concordia Lutheran Church, Pastor Jay Reinke is Hell-bent on delivering the migrants some dignity. Night after night he converts his church into a makeshift dorm and counseling center, opening the church’s doors to allow the “Overnighters” – as he calls them – to stay for a night, a week or sometimes longer, sleeping on the floor, in the pews, and in their cars in the Church parking lot.

As broken men continue to arrive in droves, the congregants sling criticism, neighbors get suspicious, and the City Council threatens an ordinance to shut the Overnighters program down. When the Williston Herald gets wind that sex offenders are among Reinke’s church guests, a mounting controversy peaks, and even the Pastor’s determination and heartfelt quest for humanity can’t stop things from spiraling enormously out of control.

A modern-day “Grapes of Wrath,” the film engages and dramatizes a set of universal societal and economic themes: the promise and limits of re-invention, redemption and compassion, as well as the tension between the moral imperative to “love thy neighbor” and the practice of one small community when confronted by a surging river of desperate, job seeking strangers.

Screened at Princeton University Lewis Center for the Arts, James M. Stewart ’32 Theater, 185 Nassau Street, Princeton.

Presented in partnership with Princeton University’s Center for the Study of Religion, Council of the Humanities, Department of Sociology, Lewis Center for the Arts, Program in American Studies and The University Center for Human Values.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Jesse Moss.

More information

Return to top

 

FRIDAY, MARCH 27


 

School’s Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten
Produced by Rona Richter, directed by Lisa Molomot
Friday Mar. 27, 12:00 p.m.
Running time: 36 min.

No classroom for these kindergarteners. In Switzerland’s Langnau am Albis, a suburb of Zurich, children 4 to 7 years of age go to kindergarten in the forest every day, no matter what the weatherman says. The filmmakers follow the forest kindergarten through the seasons of one school year, looking into the important question of what it is that children need at this age. There is laughter, beauty and amazement in the process of finding out.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Rona Richter.

More information

 

 

The Wound and the Gift
Produced and directed by Linda Hoaglund
Friday Mar. 27, 4:00 p.m.
Running time: 80 min.

“The Wound and The Gift” explores the major transformation in our relationship with animals through the growing “Rescue” movement. All over the world, people are saving the lives of animals that were bred for profit, abused, or sold on the black market. Millions of us are adopting dogs and cats from shelters, rather than buying pets from breeders and pet stores. Many people devote their lives to providing sanctuaries and shelters for rescued animals. By caring for wounded animals in need, we are learning just how much animals give back to those who care for them.

As the fable and the film unfold, the narrative spine of the film is an ancient fable about a wounded crane, saved by peasants, that attempts to express her gratitude with a gift. Scenes from the folktale weave together with stunning real life footage of rescued animals and their sanctuaries.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Linda Hoaglund.

More information

 

Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret
Produced and directed by Kip Anderson and Keegan Kuhn
Friday Mar. 27, 7:00 p.m.
Running time: 85 min.

“Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret” follows an intrepid filmmaker investigating the environmental impact large scale factory farming has on the planet. The film examines animal agriculture as the leading cause of deforestation, water consumption and pollution, and primary driver of rainforest destruction, species extinction, habitat loss, topsoil erosion, ocean “dead zones,” and virtually every other environmental ill.

More information

Return to top

 

SATURDAY, MARCH 28


 

The Puddle Garden (Storytime and Rain Garden Presentation)
Saturday Mar. 28, 10:30 a.m.

Join author Jared Rosenbaum for a dynamic reading of his new children’s book “The Puddle Garden.”

In this story full of native plants and wildlife, learn how Bear Cub invite friends to his new house – by creating a puddle farden. Bear Cub plants cardinal flower, swamp milkweed, elderberry, and more. His garden quickly fills with wild friends from hummingbirds to frogs, and his new home is no longer lonely.

The reading is followed by a presentation for children and parents on creating a native plant rain garden at home, with photos and stories about wildflowers and wildlife.

This program is intended for children ages 3 and older and their families and will run about 45 minutes.

 

Five in One
Five short films are featured in this one-hour program:

The Accidental Sea
Directed by Ransom Riggs
Running time: 6 minutes, 35 seconds
A poetic look at the doomed inland desert oasis The Salton Sea.

Tales from the Sand
Directed by Elodie Turpin
Running time: 19 minutes, 30 seconds
The sand, we look at it without paying any attention yet it is full of an abundance of varied and extraordinary animals.

Imagine a World Without Fish
Produced by the Sandy Hook Sea Life Foundation
Running time: 9 minutes, 52 seconds
The ocean is a vast eco system covering 70% of the planet but in a little over 70 years we have managed to remove more than 70% of the largest fish in the sea.

The Accidental Environmentalist
Directed, photographed, and edited by Kristine Stolakis
Running time: 12 minutes
John Wathen was just an average guy until coming into contact with toxic chemcials, stumbling upon a video camera and discovering his passion for protecting the world’s waters.

Why I Think This World Should End
Produced by Prince EA
Running time: 4 minutes, 13 seconds

 

Inhabit (East Coast Premiere)
Produced by Emmett Brennan and directed by Costa Boutsikaris
Saturday Mar. 28, 2:30 p.m.
Running time: 93 min.

“Inhabit” explores the many environmental issues facing us today and examines solutions that are being applied using the ecological design process called ‘Permaculture’. Permaculture is a design lens that uses the principles found in ecosystems to help shift our impact from destructive to regenerative. Focused mostly on the Northeastern and Midwestern regions of the United States, Inhabit provides an intimate look at permaculture peoples and practices ranging from rural, suburban, and urban landscapes.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Costa Boutsikaris. Fruit smoothies will be served courtesy of our friends at Tico’s Eatery and Juice Bar.

More information

 

Trashion Show
Saturday Mar. 28, 6:30 p.m.

Students will walk the runway modeling original “trashion” clothing designs created with imagination and recycled materials.

 

 

 

 

Project Wild Thing
Directed by David Bond
Saturday Mar. 28, 7:15 p.m.
Running time: 80 min.

Filmmaker David Bond is a worried man. His kids’ waking hours are dominated by a cacophony of marketing, and a screen dependence threatening to turn them into glassy-eyed zombies. Like city kids everywhere, they spend way too much time indoors – not like it was back in his day. He decides it’s time to get back to nature – literally.

After the screening ice cream and sorbet will be served courtesy of our friends at the bent spoon, and all invited to play in a Drum Circle led by Mark Wood, Wood N Drums.

More information

Return to top

 

SUNDAY, MARCH 29


 

Divide in Concord
Produced by David Regos & Jaedra Luke and directed by Kris Kaczor
Sunday Mar. 29, 11:00 a.m.
Running time: 82 min.

Jean Hill, a fiery octogenarian, is deeply concerned about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch—the world’s largest landfill. She spends her golden years attending city council meetings and cold-calling residents. Since 2010, she’s spearheaded a grassroots campaign to ban the sale of single-serve plastic bottled water in her hometown of Concord, Massachusetts. So far, her attempts to pass a municipal bylaw have failed. As she prepares for one last town meeting, Jean faces the strongest opposition yet, from local merchants and the International Bottled Water Association. But her fiercest challenge comes from Adriana Cohen, mother, model and celebrity publicist-turned-pundit, who insists the bill is an attack on freedom. When Adriana thrusts Jean’s crusade into the national spotlight, it’s silver-haired senior versus silver-tongued pro.

In the same town that incited the American Revolution and inspired Thoreau’s environmental movement, can one little old lady make history? A tense nail-biter of a vote will decide.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmakers Kris Kaczor and David Regos. Sunday Brunch Screening coffee courtesy of our friends at Small World Coffee.

More information

 

Occupy the Farm
Produced and directed by Todd Darling
Sunday Mar. 29, 1:30 p.m.
Running time: 90 min.

“Occupy the Farm” tells the inspiring story of a community taking direct action to create a healthier and more just food system and stewardship of a precious resource: publicly owned urban farmland. 200 farmers occupy a last piece of farmland in California’s urban East Bay, plant 15,000 seedlings to feed the community and disrupt plans to build a shopping mall. What happens next will change the fate of the land and reveal a new strategy for activism.

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Todd Darling.

More information

 

Project Wild Thing
Directed by David Bond
Sunday Mar. 29, 4:00 p.m.
Running time: 80 min.

Filmmaker David Bond is a worried man. His kids’ waking hours are dominated by a cacophony of marketing, and a screen dependence threatening to turn them into glassy-eyed zombies. Like city kids everywhere, they spend way too much time indoors – not like it was back in his day. He decides it’s time to get back to nature – literally.

More information

Return to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

RESOURCES

Festival Trailer
Schedule at a Glance